What it's like to be the parent of a child with a learning disability. The blog was created in 2005 and discusses anything to do with Down Syndrome

Sunday, 30 April 2017

The book, the audiobook & the podcast

Down's with the kids - The book / Audiobook / The podcast


Not just doing us a favour: why Saracens get it

Stan goes to Saracens once a week; not to play rugby but to do cheerleading. So on the last home game of the season Stan and two other young men (who go to the club and play rugby) were asked to come and hand out hampers to the people in the boxes and to give speeches to the banqueting tables. We explained to fans what the Saracens Sport Foundation does in the community. The three young men also took the ball on the pitch before the game kicked off. 

Keeping the teams waiting 
So I got to say the same thing to fans eight times and on each occasion I honed it. By the end I was putting together something more-or-less coherent and it goes like this:

Not just doing us a favour

I sometimes get irked when I see that a person with Down's or another learning disability has scored a touchdown or done something endearing like dance along to a busker. Not because they're doing it; all power to them. No - I get disappointed because the press report it as if it's some amazing event and often say it's 'heartwarming' and 'inspirational' when the person involved couldn't care less whether it is. 

So I told the Saracens fans, as they tucked into lunch, that Stan, Mark and Ollie weren't speaking to them and taking the ball on the pitch because someone was doing them a favour. They weren't the recipients of some kindly act because they suffer so much in their lives. That's an old-fashioned and patronising take on this kind of thing. 

It's a relationship

No. I told the rugby fans that in the same way that Saracens are putting something back into the community, Stan, Mark and Ollie are doing so likewise. It's a symbiotic relationship that I know Saracens Sport Foundation 'gets'. The fans yesterday met three young men who are great advocates for showing that people with learning disabilities have so much to contribute; by playing sport, by learning dance moves; by teaching tolerance and understanding; and by standing up and telling people about it. So they weren't there to make up the numbers in a condescending way. They were there to be part of a success story. 

See Stan, Mark and Ollie on their big day >>>

Sunday, 23 April 2017

Talking to the media about your cause: a survival guide. Podcast #5

Do you wish you had the confidence to speak to the media and raise awareness for your cause? 

Listen on Soundcloud >>>

Listen on YouTube >>>

For this edition of the podcast I’m sharing some of my tips on talking to the media. I used to work at the BBC and elsewhere and also have done many interviews raising awareness about Down’s Syndrome. But you don’t need all that experience. You can do it too. I speak to a care leaver who’s done a few interviews – and a film-maker, who helps you with what to do when recording equipment’s thrust at you. Print / online / radio / TV - why shouldn't it be you telling the world your views? Down's with the kids - the blog and book, can be found here downswiththekids.blogspot.co.uk/

Music is kindly provided by www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music. Thanks for listening.